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Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book. Trade paperback reprint hardcover; seventh printing, new price. Lackey, Mercedes and Roberta Gellis. This Scepter'd Isle. Hardcover alternate historical Tudor England fantasy. Jacket art by Larry Dixon. Little, Denise [and Martin H. Greenberg], editor[s]. The Magic Shop. The Tekno Books copyright is the only indication of Greenberg's participation. Lord, Sasha. Under a Wild Sky. Paperback historical Scottish faery feline romance.

Copyright held by Rebecca Saria, so Lord may be a pen name.

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MacKay, Scott. Paperback sf. Trade paperback omnibus reprint two sf novels, Crisis on Doona and Treaty at Doona Cover art by Michael Herring. McCoy, Judi. Wanted: One Perfect Man. Paperback comic sf romance. McKillip, Patricia A.

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Alphabet of Thorn. Hardcover fantasy. Wraparound jacket art by Kinuko Y. Niven, Larry. Three Books of Known Space. Trade paperback reprint trade paperback omnibus; seventh printing, new price. Nix, Garth. Paperback reprint hardcover young adult fantasy. Sequel to Sabriel and Lirael. O'Brien, Daniel. Trade paperback nonfiction.

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Wallace and Gromit: Catch of the Day. Art by Jimmy Hansen. Eve Dallas Divided in Death. Hardcover near-future police procedural romance. Smith, Mitchell. Snowfall 2: Kingdom River. Paperback reprint hardcover post-apocalypse sf adventure. Cover art by Michael Koelsch. Star Wars: Survivor's Quest. Hardcover movie-related sf adventure. Set three years after Luke and Mara Jade's marriage in Union.

Wraparound jacket art by Steven D. Trade paperback collection six teleplays. Windsor-Smith, Barry. Young Gods and Friends. Hardcover graphic story collection, reprinting one of the unfinished storylines from the aborted Storyteller project, adding previously unpublished related fragments. Trade paperback reshuffling of contents of paperback game-based dark fantasy novels into internal chronological order. Cover by John Van Fleet. Zakour, John and Lawrence Ganem. The Doomsday Brunette. Paperback comic sf detective pulp homage.

Cover art by Michael Koelsch [here misspelled 'Koelsh']. New Books received 17 - 23 Jan Anderson, Poul. For Love and Glory. Paperback reprint hardcover sf, based on two novellas and set in Isaac's Universe. Cover art by Vincent Di Fate. Asahi, Isamu. Origami Monsters. Trade paperback origami guide. Trade paperback academic investigation of Babylon 5 media fan activity. Digest paperback reprint paperback young adult fantasy.

Dinosaur World. Paperback reprint paperback sf. Cover art and illustrations by Wayne Barlowe. Canavan, Trudi. Paperback reprint Australian paperback fantasy. Cover art by Matt Stawicki who receives no credit, but whose signature is obscured by the author's name on the cover Clayton, Jo and Kevin Andrew Murphy. Paperback reprint hardcover fantasy. Cover art by Greg Call. Paperback reprint trade paperback fantasy; second American paperback edition.

Cover art by Cliff Nielsen. Wolf Moon. Paperback reprint paperback dark fantasy; second American paperback edition. Paperback game-based fantasy. Cover art by Daniel R. The Minotaur Wars 1: Night of Blood. Paperback reprint hardcover despite copyright game-based fantasy. Eisenmann, Chas. Trade paperback photography collection. Biographical texts by Mitchell. Farren, Mick. Renquist Quartet 4: Underland. Paperback reprint hardcover vampire.

The Rogues 4: The Yellow Silk. Cover art by Mark Zug. Frankowski, Leo.


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Conrad Stargard 7: Conrad's Time Machine. Paperback reprint hardcover prequel to the Conrad series. Conrad Stargard 7. Cover art by David Mattingly. Gaiman, Neil. The Sandman The Wake. Trade paperback reprint trade paperback graphic story collection; fifth printing. New cover design and illustration by Dave McKean. Garrett, Randall. Lord Darcy. Paperback reprint trade paperback omnibus, reprinting the fantasy mystery novel Too Many Magicians , the two collections Murder and Magic and Lord Darcy Investigates , adding three previously uncollected Darcy stories.

Compiled and edited by Eric Flint and Guy Gordon. Cover art by Gary Ruddell. Gunn, James. The Listeners. Trade paperback reprint hardcover first contact sf. Afterword by Freeman J. Harlan, Thomas. Wasteland of Flint. Paperback reprint hardcover sf Aztecs rule the world. Cover art by Chris Moore. Haseley, Dennis. A Story for Bear. Hardcover picture book. Jacket art and illustrations by Jim LaMarche. Le Guin, Ursula K. Searoad: Chronicles of Klatsand.

Trade paperback reprint hardcover collection ten stories set on the Oregon coast. McMullan, Kate. Dragon Slayers' Academy Help! Digest paperback young adult comic fantasy. Cover and interior art by Bill Basso. McMullen, Sean. The Moonworlds Saga 1: Voyage of the Shadowmoon. Wraparound cover art by Todd Lockwood. Munsch, Robert. The Paper Bag Princess.

Trade paperback reprint young reader's fantasy picture book. Front cover and illustrations by Michael Martchenko. Beowulf's Children. Paperback reprint hardcover sf; fourth printing, new price. Niven, Larry and Jerry Pournelle. Lucifer's Hammer. Paperback reprint hardcover sf; 39th printing, new price. Paperback reprint paperback sf; 28th printing, new price. New cover art by Donato Giancola.

Captain's Peril. Paperback reprint hardcover tv-based sf. Cover art by Mark Gerber. A Time to Be Born. Paperback tv-related sf adventure. Cool grate on cover presage following eight volumes. On-demand trade paperback nonfiction. Strauss, Victoria. The Burning Land. Jacket art by Mark Harrison. Teraoka, Masami. Masami Teraoka. Trade paperback art book. Text by John Stevenson. A Tolkien Compass. Trade paperback reprint nonfiction anthology, dropping Tolkien's essay per objections of the estate. Uglow, Jenny. The Warmasters. Paperback reprint hardcover anthology, with three series short novels: an Honor Harrington by Weber reprinted from Changer of Worlds ; a Hammer's Slammers by Drake, and a Belisarius by Flint.

Bill Fawcett now credited Zelazny, Roger. To Die in Italbar. Neither front cover nor spine mention the unrelated young adult sf novel, A Dark Travelling. Why the title novel wasn't paired with its partner Isle of the Dead is another mystery. Cover art by Michael Whelan. Zettel, Sarah.

Isavalta 2: The Usurper's Crown. Wraparound cover art by Romas. New Books received 10 - 16 Jan Atherton, Nancy. Aunt Dimity Takes a Holiday. Paperback reprint hardcover supernatural mystery. Aunt Dimity 8. Cover art by Jerry Lofaro. Boynton, Sandra. Barnyard Dance. Large board book reprint small board book. One, Two, Three! Pajama Time! Breathed, Berkeley.

Hardcover comic art book. Brunhoff, Laurent de. Babar's Museum of Art. Text by Phyllis Rose de Brunhoff. Trade paperback graphic story collection issues Busby, F. Rissa Kerguelen Saga 1: Young Rissa. On-demand trade paperback reprint hardcover sf. No discount. Rissa Kerguelen Saga 2: Rissa and Tregare. Carroll, Lewis. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Hardcover reprint British hardcover fantasy.

Jacket art and illustrations by Iassen Ghiuselev. Chester, Deborah. The Ruby Throne 1: Reign of Shadows. Paperback reprint paperback fantasy; second printing, new price. Cover art by Mary Jo Phallen. Telling Lies About the Wolves. On-demand trade paperback collection 14 stories, mostly gay erotica, eight original to this volume. Introduction by 'Phil Andros'. Duchin, Peter and John Morgan Wilson. Philip Damon 1: Blue Moon. Paperback reprint hardcover period San Francisco mystery. Cover art by Jill Boltin. Philip Damon 2: Good Morning, Heartache.

Hardcover period Hollywood mystery. Jacket art by Ben Gibson. Eskridge, Kelley. Trade paperback reprint hardcover sf. Virtual Light. Paperback reprint hardcover cyberpunk; 15th printing, new price. Grisham, John. The King of Torts. When youngsters are involved in these readings, elements of their identity, temporality, relationship and ways of experiencing the world are at stake, and these elements are performed and led by them in their daily lives and represented with technique and art by the characters of the narrative.

That is why youngsters become individually and collectively involved with these books, which are read with enthusiasm and shared in online or face-to-face meetings with their peers. Reactions of appreciation or rejection, likes or dislikes point out to forms of communication and belonging, of findings and interests, expressed for and with the other see also PASQUIER , p. When interacting with the saga of their heroes, youngsters show something about their own conditions. The books most cited have young characters playing central roles who must face a series of challenges, including risks and overcoming of limitations, with fabulous full of magic and enchanted beings and at the same time cruel scenes full of violence and destruction.

Thus, these narratives amuse and entertain, but remit to the dark aspects of reality when pointing out the evil, which is always threatening, while cherishing dreams of the future in a fragile present. Also, the magic world and epic heroism break up close temporalities, bringing the past and the future together in the intense present of daily adventures. Youngsters are at the center of the narrative, facing memories and fears at every episode.

Magic helps, but does not take the leading role away from them: Harry Potter is threatened by the Dark Lord and his servants; Bella and Edward the couple playing the central role in The Twilight Saga go beyond their identities to become love partners, facing risks with their friends; the Pevensie siblings overcome their age differences and also a treason to fight the White Witch, sharing risks and victories with their allies The Chronicles of Narnia ; hobbits face adversities to control the evil power of a magic ring and to fight for freedom The Lord of the Rings.

Therefore, the narrative dramatizes several elements of the daily condition of young people: being involved in a plot of emotions and risks; vulnerability despite the joy of living; relationship crises and breaking up with childhood; different temporalities between memories of the past and possibilities for the future; the challenge posed by adversities; telling good from evil; the simultaneous state of being friends with your allies and being alone as a hero; going through different psycho-emotional states and a catharsis of your own fears; daily pursuit of a motivational meaning for your life in order not to perish.

Recent magic tales are different from the science fiction literature of the seventies and eighties. From the eighties onwards, mythological narratives are easily found on books and screens. As very well described by Campbell, both the characters and the enthusiastic readers of these narratives are young heroes setting out on a journey of hardships and meaning to their lives. And just like in real life where youngsters have meaningful persons as reference, the leading characters expose their youth condition when interacting with their masters Dumbledore, Gandalf, Aslam and friends Hermione, Sam, Caspian , where they find wisdom and safety, support and understanding.

We can also note some differences between science fiction fiction and recent mythical productions fantasy , each one of its own setting: science fiction from the seventies and the eighties place emphasis on the control and use of technologies for the good of humanity and the planet, with plots containing futuristic appeals, using laser rays and telepathy to overcome the tacit fear of a nuclear war. On the other hand, the reedited mythological narratives of today place emphasis on a hero that matures after facing hardships, with daily dramas, resorting to the experience of a wise person and to the powers of magic to face the evil that threatens the present days.

The laser swords and extraterrestrial beings of science fiction are replaced with the magic wands and magic entities of tales. However, the leading role of young heroes continues to be highly valued. From the perspective of the experience, the daily lives of modern youngsters are more closely related to the former setting of a mythical inspiration than to the latter of a scientific inspiration : after decades of scientific and technological advancement, of atomic and genetic achievements, juvenile subjectivity is under construction, surrounded by new family arrangements, seeking to establish ties, afraid of environmental catastrophes, moving from one quick and simultaneous connection to the other, with time and space getting smaller and smaller in a present time that is so accelerated.

From the perspective of young people, time is concentrated into an extended day: the possibilities of choice are diversified, the risks are added and time runs by. Among such challenges, one can name, in the social daily lives of youngsters, family, school and labor hardships, whose present and future possibilities pose risks which are equally present and future. In fact, modern scientific rationality is a recent datum is Western history starting in the 16 th century when compared to mythological collections, whose symbols and narratives have been used by us to understand and populate Earth over the centuries.

The functions of aid and meaning that tales have today count on an extensive pre-edition process in our minds, rites and sacred texts, being active not only in Religion, but also in Literature and Arts, in general and above all, in the architecture of our psyche:.

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1 - Wikipedia

Despite having limited language and reality interpretation, mythologies have shaped human history over the centuries and give access to obscure elements of our psyche that still motivate poetry, arts, human sciences and technology. Childhood and adolescence are particular sensitive to mythologies, which follow our growth and contribute to a paideia of existence: good leading us through ties and disruptions, in an initiation to new psychological and cognitive heights, until reaching maturity in adulthood. Then we experience another enchantment, purified by our living experiences, and begin telling tales to the youngsters, having the feeling we are - finally!

We have pointed out some demands and opportunities that young students propose to the school, from their readings and their mediatized cultural context:. We have observed mediatization has speeded up decentralization of reading, which today goes beyond and influences its traditional spaces, like schools, libraries, universities and homes, in force from medieval times to first modernity. Along with such territorialization of reading and writing, new ways of text circulation have been created, with diversity and simultaneity, favored by recent technological aids, such as cable TV and the internet, and their access devices: computers, iPhones, tablets, etc.

This is not restricted to the technique, and it affects the relationship between the individual and texts which - although referring to authors and documental sources - have their interpretation less linked to some kind of authority. Narratives certainly establish significant links between argument and authority, links which are entangled in texts and perceived after a more careful or investigative reading.

However, these links of authority are no longer restricted to their traditional spaces, making text interpretation conditioning less likely to occur, which is currently relative to the subjectivity of readers. This certainly compromises critics and the competences needed in reading, especially in informative, scientific and scholar readings, and this is a call to education to play its role.

In addition to the new aids, the diversity, quickness and simultaneity of accesses influence vocabulary, cognition, and reading mental and actual time, which are fragmented and crossed by the pathways of mediatic interaction. This promotes analyses that obviously go beyond the lines of this article.

Especially because the new protocols affect both information assimilation and the construction of self, in addition to sociability, and this happens as a result of the referred to rapidity and interaction. And even if it causes education to be displaced, we have to accept we are living another chapter in the millenary history of books and reading, which has always been in course. The author says:.

I see it as a project that puts the idea of culture the school works with in our countries in first place so that it can begin to recognize sciences and technologies, both as productivity devices and as ways to transform how we perceive, know and feel. These data request schools to indicate their position: new educational projects must correspond to the new generation of students. As indicated earlier, we have noted that mythological narratives offer readers a religious aid, in the anthropological sense of the word: they contribute to a continuous reinterpretation of personal and community experiences relegere ; reconnect individuals with one another, with nature and with transcendence religare.

Today, we notice this old function of the myth has been redimensioned, both in editorial and commercial terms, by mediatization of narratives, which have been retold in new formats, with new emphases, in books, films and games. Therefore, the productions mentioned affect modern youngsters, who are seen as readers, viewers and interpreters. However, there is one difference as to the circulation and acceptance of narratives: modern youngsters are no longer bound to tradition ancestry that generated the myth, with their endogenous codes and initiators, nor to the guardian authority of narrated lessons clan, school, religion.

Instead, their are connected to mediatic networks, translating and reediting the old narrative according to the language and sensitivity of new generations. In other words, the ancestral sense is extradited from its place of origin - as mentioned by Piglia - and taken to the territoriality of the media: myth elements are preserved in new technological containers, with a pace and inscription that are suitable to the communicational sensitivity of young people.

Thus, myth lessons are transmitted through media, which confer four characteristics to the old text: instantaneity, rapidity, plurality and interactivity. The books and films address the universe of myths and magic initiations, following the displaced rationality and sensitivity of the youth itself: born amid the Modernity crisis, modern youth has incorporated the lights and shadows of Religions, Sciences and the Market, simultaneously experimenting the ambiguities and opportunities, the limits and possibilities of present times. In fact, youngsters experience displacements and hybridizations, tired of functional analyses and of those who seeking for syntheses which are still being rehearsed.

This is the spaces that opens up to mythical rationality, with its narratives, masters and senses. This does not seem to be a new mythologization of the world, nor a simple return of young people to the pre-modern paradigm; instead, it seems to be a cultural change, a move of sensitivity and knowledge that makes them pursue intelligibility of themselves and of the world, which is more receptive to their yearnings in respect to the society and the planet.

Thus, magic addresses Ecology, villains address Politics, degrees of initiation address the School, the hardships faced address Sociology: youngsters, with their readings and audiences, are narrating their conditions and perceptions of being in the world. Whether dense or fragmented, of a scientific nature or not, the readings offered in the media are seen as more meaningful and more diversified, and are readily accessible, attracting young students.

These readings contrast with the books and the reading pace proposed at school, which are established not only in the curriculum, but also in the ways of reading, which favor group, hegemonic and less interactive readings.

However, this will not eliminate the role and the space of school in encouraging reading and writing, with an argumentative, conceptual and grammatical approach to texts. On the contrary, mediatization of reading and writing requires the school to change its role to once again take on the responsibility of the art of teaching , with refreshed competence, as indicated in the topics above. Put simply, the dissemination of hardcopy and electronic texts might diversify school reading and suggest new technologies in teaching and pedagogical practices.

Nevertheless, the art of teaching - the perpetuation of the old art of teaching concepts, meanings and interpretations - uses not only new instrumental resources, but also new expressions of presence, competence and incidence when educators interact with their students. Considering that concepts require metaphors, meanings require examples and interpretations require critics, two things have become clear: a that the lesson lectio covers the letter littera and also goes beyond it, because teaching is moving from matters to individuals, from letters to meanings, from the ex-scriptura of codes to the in-scriptura of understanding.

Therefore, to the media offer, the school should respond by offering accessible and meaningful mediators to youngsters, recognizing them both as young people and students , simultaneously. Readers in mediatization in our classrooms are not seeking for technologies, but for the connections made possible by such technologies, in a relationship that is, most of the time, mobile and fluid, but also open to the meaningful presence of narrators of meaning that appreciate and encourage them, following them on a journey of encounter and knowledge.

Porto Alegre: Sulina, v. Lisboa: Instituto Piaget, On the other hand, the reedited mythological narratives of today place emphasis on a hero that matures after facing hardships, with daily dramas, resorting to the experience of a wise person and to the powers of magic to face the evil that threatens the present days. The laser swords and extraterrestrial beings of science fiction are replaced with the magic wands and magic entities of tales. However, the leading role of young heroes continues to be highly valued.

From the perspective of the experience, the daily lives of modern youngsters are more closely related to the former setting of a mythical inspiration than to the latter of a scientific inspiration : after decades of scientific and technological advancement, of atomic and genetic achievements, juvenile subjectivity is under construction, surrounded by new family arrangements, seeking to establish ties, afraid of environmental catastrophes, moving from one quick and simultaneous connection to the other, with time and space getting smaller and smaller in a present time that is so accelerated.

From the perspective of young people, time is concentrated into an extended day: the possibilities of choice are diversified, the risks are added and time runs by. Among such challenges, one can name, in the social daily lives of youngsters, family, school and labor hardships, whose present and future possibilities pose risks which are equally present and future.

In fact, modern scientific rationality is a recent datum is Western history starting in the 16 th century when compared to mythological collections, whose symbols and narratives have been used by us to understand and populate Earth over the centuries. The functions of aid and meaning that tales have today count on an extensive pre-edition process in our minds, rites and sacred texts, being active not only in Religion, but also in Literature and Arts, in general and above all, in the architecture of our psyche:.

Despite having limited language and reality interpretation, mythologies have shaped human history over the centuries and give access to obscure elements of our psyche that still motivate poetry, arts, human sciences and technology. Childhood and adolescence are particular sensitive to mythologies, which follow our growth and contribute to a paideia of existence: good leading us through ties and disruptions, in an initiation to new psychological and cognitive heights, until reaching maturity in adulthood. Then we experience another enchantment, purified by our living experiences, and begin telling tales to the youngsters, having the feeling we are - finally!

We have pointed out some demands and opportunities that young students propose to the school, from their readings and their mediatized cultural context:. We have observed mediatization has speeded up decentralization of reading, which today goes beyond and influences its traditional spaces, like schools, libraries, universities and homes, in force from medieval times to first modernity. Along with such territorialization of reading and writing, new ways of text circulation have been created, with diversity and simultaneity, favored by recent technological aids, such as cable TV and the internet, and their access devices: computers, iPhones, tablets, etc.

This is not restricted to the technique, and it affects the relationship between the individual and texts which - although referring to authors and documental sources - have their interpretation less linked to some kind of authority. Narratives certainly establish significant links between argument and authority, links which are entangled in texts and perceived after a more careful or investigative reading.

However, these links of authority are no longer restricted to their traditional spaces, making text interpretation conditioning less likely to occur, which is currently relative to the subjectivity of readers. This certainly compromises critics and the competences needed in reading, especially in informative, scientific and scholar readings, and this is a call to education to play its role.

In addition to the new aids, the diversity, quickness and simultaneity of accesses influence vocabulary, cognition, and reading mental and actual time, which are fragmented and crossed by the pathways of mediatic interaction. This promotes analyses that obviously go beyond the lines of this article. Especially because the new protocols affect both information assimilation and the construction of self, in addition to sociability, and this happens as a result of the referred to rapidity and interaction.

And even if it causes education to be displaced, we have to accept we are living another chapter in the millenary history of books and reading, which has always been in course. The author says:. I see it as a project that puts the idea of culture the school works with in our countries in first place so that it can begin to recognize sciences and technologies, both as productivity devices and as ways to transform how we perceive, know and feel.

These data request schools to indicate their position: new educational projects must correspond to the new generation of students. As indicated earlier, we have noted that mythological narratives offer readers a religious aid, in the anthropological sense of the word: they contribute to a continuous reinterpretation of personal and community experiences relegere ; reconnect individuals with one another, with nature and with transcendence religare.

Today, we notice this old function of the myth has been redimensioned, both in editorial and commercial terms, by mediatization of narratives, which have been retold in new formats, with new emphases, in books, films and games. Therefore, the productions mentioned affect modern youngsters, who are seen as readers, viewers and interpreters. However, there is one difference as to the circulation and acceptance of narratives: modern youngsters are no longer bound to tradition ancestry that generated the myth, with their endogenous codes and initiators, nor to the guardian authority of narrated lessons clan, school, religion.

Instead, their are connected to mediatic networks, translating and reediting the old narrative according to the language and sensitivity of new generations. In other words, the ancestral sense is extradited from its place of origin - as mentioned by Piglia - and taken to the territoriality of the media: myth elements are preserved in new technological containers, with a pace and inscription that are suitable to the communicational sensitivity of young people. Thus, myth lessons are transmitted through media, which confer four characteristics to the old text: instantaneity, rapidity, plurality and interactivity.

The books and films address the universe of myths and magic initiations, following the displaced rationality and sensitivity of the youth itself: born amid the Modernity crisis, modern youth has incorporated the lights and shadows of Religions, Sciences and the Market, simultaneously experimenting the ambiguities and opportunities, the limits and possibilities of present times. In fact, youngsters experience displacements and hybridizations, tired of functional analyses and of those who seeking for syntheses which are still being rehearsed.

This is the spaces that opens up to mythical rationality, with its narratives, masters and senses. This does not seem to be a new mythologization of the world, nor a simple return of young people to the pre-modern paradigm; instead, it seems to be a cultural change, a move of sensitivity and knowledge that makes them pursue intelligibility of themselves and of the world, which is more receptive to their yearnings in respect to the society and the planet.

Thus, magic addresses Ecology, villains address Politics, degrees of initiation address the School, the hardships faced address Sociology: youngsters, with their readings and audiences, are narrating their conditions and perceptions of being in the world. Whether dense or fragmented, of a scientific nature or not, the readings offered in the media are seen as more meaningful and more diversified, and are readily accessible, attracting young students.

These readings contrast with the books and the reading pace proposed at school, which are established not only in the curriculum, but also in the ways of reading, which favor group, hegemonic and less interactive readings. However, this will not eliminate the role and the space of school in encouraging reading and writing, with an argumentative, conceptual and grammatical approach to texts.

On the contrary, mediatization of reading and writing requires the school to change its role to once again take on the responsibility of the art of teaching , with refreshed competence, as indicated in the topics above. Put simply, the dissemination of hardcopy and electronic texts might diversify school reading and suggest new technologies in teaching and pedagogical practices.

Nevertheless, the art of teaching - the perpetuation of the old art of teaching concepts, meanings and interpretations - uses not only new instrumental resources, but also new expressions of presence, competence and incidence when educators interact with their students. Considering that concepts require metaphors, meanings require examples and interpretations require critics, two things have become clear: a that the lesson lectio covers the letter littera and also goes beyond it, because teaching is moving from matters to individuals, from letters to meanings, from the ex-scriptura of codes to the in-scriptura of understanding.

Therefore, to the media offer, the school should respond by offering accessible and meaningful mediators to youngsters, recognizing them both as young people and students , simultaneously. Readers in mediatization in our classrooms are not seeking for technologies, but for the connections made possible by such technologies, in a relationship that is, most of the time, mobile and fluid, but also open to the meaningful presence of narrators of meaning that appreciate and encourage them, following them on a journey of encounter and knowledge.

Porto Alegre: Sulina, v. Lisboa: Instituto Piaget, Mito e realidade. Aspectos incomuns do sagrado. O labirinto sagrado. Buenos Aires: Losada, b. Sociedade midiatizada. Rio de Janeiro: Mauad, Paris: Autrement, Anais do CongressoIV. Belo Horizonte: Abralic, p. Videoculturas del fin de siglo. Rio de Janeiro: Contexto, Therefore, mediatization would be a social process that changes how human communication, and its issues, is conceived, which get to be combined in the cultural context of techno-interaction, literally entangling individuals and institutions.

Field research lasted one year , and questionnaires were applied, 28 individual interviews were conducted and six groups of discussion were held. The real names of the schools and youngsters used in this paper were withheld to preserve their identities. Ethical guidelines were followed for the research study conducted with the youngsters and schools.